Military & Veterans Affairs

Dancer-Muñoz-Bucco bill saluting the creation of the New Jersey State Police passes the Assembly

TRENTON, N.J. – A resolution (AJR-126/SJR85) commemorating the 95th anniversary of the first graduating class of New Jersey’s State Police, sponsored by Assembly Republicans Ron Dancer, Nancy F. Muñoz and Anthony M. Bucco, was advanced by the General Assembly today.

“At a time when the law enforcement community around the country is under attack, it’s especially important to take a moment to honor and commemorate New Jersey’s finest for a job well done,” said Dancer (R-Ocean). “The members and staff of New Jersey’s State Police comprise one of the most prestigious law enforcement agencies in the nation and world. These exceptional men and women put their lives on the line every day to serve and protect.”

Herbert Norman Schwarzkopf, a West Point graduate, was appointed as the agency’s first superintendent on July 1, 1921. Its success is attributed to his vision for expanding the state police’s mission beyond the apprehension of criminals.

“New Jersey’s State Police have served our state and its residents with integrity and professionalism for nearly a century,” said Muñoz (R-Union). “Since that first graduating class in March 1921, our state police force has embraced then Superintendent Schwarzkopf’s vision. Today they are instrumental in preventing crimes by educating the public about ways to protect themselves and their neighborhoods. This resolution demonstrates our gratitude for all they do.”

The joint resolution commemorates the establishment and service of the New Jersey State Police and celebrates the 95th anniversary of its first graduating class.

“Guided by the rule of ‘honor, duty and fidelity,’ New Jersey’s State Police not only perform their everyday duties in our communities, but they are often called upon to support localities around the country during disaster relief efforts and civil unrest,” said Bucco (R-Morris). “They go above and beyond to safeguard our citizens here in New Jersey and beyond.”

REMEMBERING ALL WHO SERVED OUR NATION

On May 25, Americans at home and abroad will pause to observe Memorial Day.  Since the first observation on May 5, 1868, then called Declaration Day, it has been a day to remember, reflect upon, and appreciate those who sacrificed and gave their lives to defend our right to freedom in the United States.  We owe our thanks and honor to those who served in conflict to protect our land and to keep America the land of the free for over two hundred years.

Memorial Day is a time for remembrance for the men and women who fought in America’s battles, and we acknowledge the tremendous contributions of those serving in the Air Force, Army, Navy, Marines and the Coast Guard.  There is another group that I would like to highlight, a group of service men and women who are often overlooked in the discussions about those who served our country.

Many associate the United States Merchant Marines with the role they play in the day-to-day operations on the seas in service of our national and global economies.  Rarely mentioned is the role Mariners have played in supporting our war efforts dating back to the American Revolution.  Since the time of the Revolutionary War through our current War on Terror, the Merchant Marines have carried critical supplies, equipment, and personnel to our Armed Forces, often through dangerous waters. The sacrifices of Mariners during World War II sailing through waters well-covered by German U-boats reflect the dangers that these servicemen encountered in duty to their country.  One of every twenty-four Mariners lost their lives during the war, by far the highest casualty rate of any service group.

Two crewmembers of the SS Stephen Hopkins—Captain Paul Buck and Midshipman Edwin Joseph O’Hara—were posthumously awarded the Merchant Marine Distinguished Service Medal for their role in sinking the German commerce raider Stier.  Despite just one four-inch gun in defense against the heavily armed Nazi cruiser, the Hopkins crew sank the enemy’s ship, before going under itself.  The few American survivors floated on a lifeboat for more than a month before reaching the coast of Brazil.  Sadly, most of the crew lost their lives fighting to keep the seas free.

The freedoms that we enjoy were made possible by those individuals who were willing to make the ultimate sacrifice.  Our Armed Forces continue to maintain the same standard of commitment and honor that was declared over two hundred years ago.   It is my hope that we will expand our acknowledgements of the successes of the brave Merchant Mariners by passing Assembly Resolution 105, which honors the United States Merchant Marine.  On Monday, let us reflect on the sacrifices of all who died in service to defending our way of life, so that freedom can continue to ring across our great nation.

 

MUÑOZ RESOLUTION DESIGNATING JULY 1 AS ‘ U.S. CADET NURSE CORPS DAY’ APPROVED BY GENERAL ASSEMBLY

A resolution sponsored by Assembly Republican Nancy F. Muñoz memorializing the contributions of the women in the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps earned approval yesterday from the General Assembly. Muñoz’s resolution, AJR-84, designates July 1 of every year as “U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps Day.”

“The Cadet Nurse Corps paved the way for improvements in educational standards and training,” said Muñoz, R-Union, Morris and Somerset. “By opening the nursing careers to more than 124,000 young women when there was a desperate need for nursing, the program changed the face of nursing in the United States.”

American nursing schools, which previously only accepted white students, were integrated by the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps, which recruited thousands of African-American women nurses.

“During the war, with so many nurses committed to military service, there was a critical shortage of skilled nurses on the home front. Within two years of the formation of the corps, Cadet Nurses accounted for 80 percent of American nursing care. These young nurses were World War II heroes in every sense. We should celebrate their efforts and preserve their memory,” said Muñoz, noting that her mother was a Cadet Nurse, trained in one of the final classes at the end of World War II.

ASSEMBLY PANEL APPROVES MUÑOZ RESOLUTION DESIGNATING JULY 1 AS ‘ U.S. CADET NURSE CORPS DAY’

Assembly Republican Nancy F. Muñoz sponsors a resolution memorializing the contributions of the women in the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps. AJR-84, approved unanimously by the Assembly Women and Children Committee, designates July 1 of every year as “U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps Day.”

Muñoz said her mother was a Cadet Nurse, trained in one of the final classes at the end of World War II. Muñoz followed her footsteps into the healthcare profession. “The Cadet Nurse Corps changed the face of nursing in this county,” said Muñoz, R-Union, Morris and Somerset. “The program paved the way for improvements in educational standards and training, and helped launch more than 124,000 young women into careers at a time when there was a desperate need for nursing.”

“During the war, with so many nurses committed to military service, there was a critical shortage of skilled nurses on the home front,” Muñoz said. “Within two years of the formation of the corps, Cadet Nurses accounted for 80 percent of American nursing care. These young nurses were World War II heroes in every sense. We should celebrate their efforts and preserve their memory.”

American nursing schools, which previously only accepted white students, were integrated by the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps, which recruited thousands of African-American women nurses.

MUÑOZ, MCHOSE MEMORIALIZE U.S. CADET NURSE CORPS WITH RESOLUTION APPROVED BY ASSEMBLY PANEL

A resolution by Assembly Republicans Nancy F. Muñoz and Alison Littell McHose commemorating the life-saving contributions of women in the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps earned unanimous approval of the Military and Veterans’ Affairs Committee today. The resolution (AR-129) designates July 1, 2015 as U.S. Cadet Nurses Day.

“The Cadet Nurses Corps changed the face of nursing in this country,” said Muñoz, whose mother was a member of one of the final Corps classes. “World War II was still going on, and she became a nurse through the program.”“Cadet Nurses were World War II heroes on the home front,” said Munoz, R-Union, Morris and Somerset. “During the war, with so many nurses committed to military service, there was a critical shortage of skilled nurses for the nation’s hospitals. Within two years of the formation of the corps, Cadet Nurses accounted for 80 percent of American nursing care. We should celebrate their efforts and preserve their memory.”

American nursing schools, which previously only accepted white students, were integrated by the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps, which recruited thousands of African-American women nurses.

The Corps developed more than 124,000 desperately needed nurses, and was responsible for increasing the educational standards of many of the country’s nursing schools. While war waged overseas, the U.S. Cadet Nurses battled polio and tuberculosis epidemics, and after the war, many continued to work in the nursing field.“The Corps provided opportunity, scholarships and stipends for many young women who could not have otherwise afforded the education,” said McHose, R – Sussex, Warren and Morris. “And without the addition of these young caregivers, the nation’s hospitals would never have been able to meet the patient demands. They were tireless young women who responded to the challenge and exceeded expectations.”

ASSEMBLY APPROVES MCHOSE-MUÑOZ VETERANS EDUCATION BENEFITS RESOLUTION

A resolution sponsored by Assemblywomen Alison Littell McHose and Nancy F. Muñoz, urging the President and Congress to enact legislation that would allow all Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans to transfer their education benefits to dependents, was approved today by the General Assembly.

Under the “Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2007,” only members of the U.S. Armed Forces serving in Iraq and Afghanistanon or after August 1, 2009, are eligible to transfer their education benefits to their spouses or children. As a result, war veterans who served following the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, but ended their service prior to August 1, 2009, are unable to transfer their education benefits to their dependents.

“There’s no justification for excluding the families of veterans who served between 2001 and 2009 from being able to utilize these education benefits,” said McHose, R-Sussex,Warrenand Morris. “They made the same sacrifices as the veterans serving after them. Preventing their dependents from sharing in this benefit when they were the first ones to answer the call following the terrorist attacks on our country on September 11, 2001, is wrong. This is an oversight that needs to be corrected.”

“All our war veterans sacrificed the same regardless of when they served,” stated Muñoz, R-Union, Morris andSomerset. “To deny their spouses and children from sharing in this benefit would be a gross injustice. We owe an incredible debt to all the men and women who served in Iraq and Afghanistanwars following the terrorist attacks on our nation in 2001. There’s no excuse for the President and Congress not to amend the current legislation so that it is equitable for all.”

The McHose-Muñoz resolution, ACR-124, respectfully urges the President and Congress to enact legislation that permits all veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, including those who fought between 2001 and 2009, to transfer their education benefits to their dependents. This resolution came about after a war veteran reached out to McHose asking for assistance to get this federal law changed

COMMITTEE APPROVES McHOSE-MUÑOZ VETERANS EDUCATION BENEFITS RESOLUTION

A resolution sponsored by Assemblywomen Alison Littell McHose and Nancy F. Muñoz, urging the President and Congress to enact legislation that would allow all Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans to transfer their education benefits to dependents, was approved today by the Assembly Military & Veterans’ Affairs Committee.

Under the “Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2007,” only members of the U.S. Armed Forces serving in Iraq and Afghanistan on or after August 1, 2009, are eligible to transfer their education benefits to their spouses or children. As a result, war veterans who served following the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, but ended their service prior to August 1, 2009, are unable to transfer their education benefits to their dependents.

“This benefit should absolutely apply to veterans who served between 2001 and July 2009,” said McHose, R-Sussex,Warren and  Morris. “To exclude them is grossly unfair to both our soldiers and their families who have both made enormous sacrifices. Preventing them from sharing in this benefit when they were the first ones to answer the call following the terrorist attacks on our country on September 11, 2001, is wrong. This resolution calls on the President and Congress to correct this oversight.”

“It shouldn’t matter whether a soldier was the first or last to go. We owe an incredible debt to all the men and women who served in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan following the terrorist attacks on our nation in 2001,” stated Muñoz, R-Union, Morris and Somerset. “All the spouses and children of our war veterans should be afforded the same benefits. They all sacrificed the same regardless of when they served. I would hope that our federal officials will amend the current legislation so that it is equitable for all.”

The McHose/Muñoz resolution, ACR-124, respectfully urges the President and Congress to enact legislation that permits all veterans of the wars inIraqandAfghanistan, including those who fought between 2001 and 2009, to transfer their education benefits to their dependents.  This resolution came about after a war veteran reached out to McHose asking for assistance to get this federal law change.

MUÑOZ YELLOW RIBBON RESOLUTION CLEARS MILITARY & VETERANS’ COMMITTEE

A resolution sponsored by Assemblywoman Nancy F. Muñoz that honors American military troops by encouraging the display of yellow ribbons was unanimously approved today by the Assembly Military & Veterans’ Affairs Committee.

“The yellow ribbon has come to be recognized as signifying honor, courage, and hope for military families and loved ones,” said Muñoz, R-Union, Morris and Somerset. “So many of our military personnel and civilian men and women have answered the call to protect our nation from harm and preserve peace and democracy in Iraq, Afghanistan and around the world. It’s a debt we can never repay. The least we can do is show our continuing support by displaying these symbolic yellow ribbons throughout our communities.”

The resolution, AR-48, signifies that the General Assembly recognizes and honors American military troops and civilian men and women around the world working and fighting to preserve peace and democracy. It encourages the public to show their support by participating in “The Yellow Ribbon Campaign” by displaying yellow ribbons on their homes and businesses, and encourages municipalities to start their own patriotic societies.

COMMITTEE APPROVES McHOSE-MUÑOZ VETERANS EDUCATION BENEFITS RESOLUTION

A resolution urging the President and Congress to enact legislation that would allow all Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans to transfer their education benefits to dependents was approved today by the Assembly Military and Veterans’ Affairs Committee. It is sponsored by Assemblywomen Alison Littell McHose, R-24, and Nancy F. Muñoz, R-21.

Under the “Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2007,” only members of the U.S. Armed Forces serving in Iraq and Afghanistan on or after August 1, 2009, are eligible to transfer their education benefits to their spouses or children. As a result, war veterans who served following the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, but ended their service prior to August 1, 2009, are unable to transfer their education benefits to their dependents.

“Certainly, this benefit should apply to those who served between 2001 and July 2009,” said McHose. “To do otherwise, is grossly unfair to both our soldiers and their families who have both made enormous sacrifices. Excluding them from sharing in this benefit when they were the first ones to answer the call following the terrorist attacks on our country on September 11, 2001, is wrong. This resolution calls on the President and Congress to correct this oversight.”

“We owe an incredible debt to all the men and women who served in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan following the terrorist attacks on our nation in 2001,” stated Muñoz. “It shouldn’t matter whether they were the first or last to go. All the spouses and children of our war veterans should be afforded the same benefits. They all sacrificed the same regardless of when they served. I would hope that our federal officials will amend the current legislation so that it is equitable for all.”

The McHose/Muñoz resolution, ACR-153, respectfully urges the President and Congress to enact legislation that permits all veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, including those who fought between 2001 and 2009, to transfer their education benefits to their dependents.  This resolution came about after a war veteran reached out to Assemblywoman McHose asking for assistance to get this federal law change.